Earthship

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The most versatile and economical sustainable green building design in the world. This building method is called Biotecture and is based on the work of principal architect, Michael Reynolds.

Earthship Design Principles:

1) Thermal/Solar Heating & Cooling: 
Earthships maintain comfortable temperatures in any climate. The planet Earth is a thermally stabilizing mass that delivers temperature without wire or pipes. The sun is a nuclear power plant that also delivers without wires or pipes.

2) Solar & Wind Electricity: 
Earthships produce their own electricity with a prepackaged photovoltaic / wind power system. This energy is stored in batteries and supplied to your electrical outlets. Earthships can have multiple sources of power, all automated, including grid-intertie.

3) Contained Sewage Treatment
: Earthships contain use and reuse all household sewage in indoor and outdoor treatment cells resulting in food production and landscaping with no pollution of aquifers. Toilets flush with greywater that does not smell.

4) Building with Natural &
Recycled Materials: 
House as Assemblage of by-products: A sustainable home must make use of indigenous materials, those occurring naturally in the local area.

5) Water Harvesting
: Earthships catch water from the sky (rain & snow melt) and use it four times. Water is heated from the sun, biodiesel and/or natural gas. Earthships can have city water as backup. Earthships do not pollute underground water aquifers.

6) Food Production
: Earthship wetlands, the planters that hold hundreds of gallons of water from sinks and the shower are a great place for raising some of the fresh produce you’d like to have in the winter, but find expensive or bland tasting from the supermarket.

TuboHotel / t3arc

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Designed by t3arc, the recycled pipe Tubohotel accommodates two people in a queen bed with panoramic views of the Sierra del Tepozteco outside of Cuernavaca. The goal in designing the modular hotel was to build fast and affordable accommodations while offering new tourism services to the area.

Each tube is 2.44 m wide and 3.50 m long and accommodates a queen bed with space underneath for storage. Custom built end caps provide windows and a door on one side with curtains for privacy. The tube rooms certainly aren’t large enough for a bathroom, so the hotel offers two bathhouses for their guests’ use.

t3arc was responsible for building the first modular set of three tube rooms, while the hotel completed the remaining rooms. The tubes were placed around a central outdoor courtyard situated amongst the trees with respect to the topography. Construction of the hotel took about 3 months.

:tubohotel

:t3arc

The Timmelsjoch Experience Pass Museum by Werner Tscholl

 

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photographs by Alexa Rainer

A road, formerly used mainly by migrating wild animals, connects the Pesseiertal and Ötztal valleys. These valleys, surrounded by a natural border created by the foot of the Timmelsjoch mountain chain, are connected by an ancient and rare simmilarity. Architectonic sculptures, situated on several touristic stops  along the road, introduce the beautiful landscape panoramas, its history, cultural background as well as local community and the economy of the region. Located along a mountain pass, the Timmelsjoch Experience Pass Museum was constructed to celebrate the road’s fiftieth anniversary.

Located on the border of Germany (North Tyrole) and Italy the Pass Museum points out towards the South Tyrole side with its boulder-like structure. Glass covers the internal walls of the building and is faceted to resemble the inside of an icy cave, which honors the pioneers of High Alpine Road and their advancements.

This is breath-taking. What a beautiful work of art for all passerby’s to experience. I can’t wait to take that road trip!

:dezeen

:architecturelover