Recycled Art

Artist: Rick Ladd – Bottle cap furniture is created from recycled caps saved by the nice bartenders who work at Rick’s local bar.

This creative recycled art sculpture was constructed in 2006 by Indian artist Subodh. Very Hungry God made its debut in Paris but it is now in the private collection of Francois Pinault, a billionaire French businessman with the biggest collection of contemporary art worldwide. At the time of this writing the amazing recycled art sculpture was on display outside of Pinault’s Palazzo Grassi by the Grand Canal in Venice.
Gupta gets his inspiration from his childhood; he likes to include familiar items from his youth. This giant skull sculpture was created from stainless steel kitchen utensils, indeed an amazing way to construct creative recycled art!

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Dr. Evermor’s Forevertron, built in the 1980s, is the largest scrap metal sculpture in the world, standing 50 ft. (15,2 m.) high and 120 ft. (36,5 m.) wide, and weighing 300 tons. It is housed in Dr. Evermore’s Art Park on Highway 12, in the town of Sumpter, in Sauk County, Wisconsin, United States.

Nick Georgiou recycles his old newspapers, but probably not in the same way that most people do. The Queens, NY based green artist makes three dimensional sculptures from the waste material including the piece pictured above which is reminiscent of Edvard Munch‘s famous painting, ‘Scream.’

 

“Broken Family” by Anthony Haywood, uses all the household waste to construct an elephant.

Earthship

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The most versatile and economical sustainable green building design in the world. This building method is called Biotecture and is based on the work of principal architect, Michael Reynolds.

Earthship Design Principles:

1) Thermal/Solar Heating & Cooling: 
Earthships maintain comfortable temperatures in any climate. The planet Earth is a thermally stabilizing mass that delivers temperature without wire or pipes. The sun is a nuclear power plant that also delivers without wires or pipes.

2) Solar & Wind Electricity: 
Earthships produce their own electricity with a prepackaged photovoltaic / wind power system. This energy is stored in batteries and supplied to your electrical outlets. Earthships can have multiple sources of power, all automated, including grid-intertie.

3) Contained Sewage Treatment
: Earthships contain use and reuse all household sewage in indoor and outdoor treatment cells resulting in food production and landscaping with no pollution of aquifers. Toilets flush with greywater that does not smell.

4) Building with Natural &
Recycled Materials: 
House as Assemblage of by-products: A sustainable home must make use of indigenous materials, those occurring naturally in the local area.

5) Water Harvesting
: Earthships catch water from the sky (rain & snow melt) and use it four times. Water is heated from the sun, biodiesel and/or natural gas. Earthships can have city water as backup. Earthships do not pollute underground water aquifers.

6) Food Production
: Earthship wetlands, the planters that hold hundreds of gallons of water from sinks and the shower are a great place for raising some of the fresh produce you’d like to have in the winter, but find expensive or bland tasting from the supermarket.

TuboHotel / t3arc

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Designed by t3arc, the recycled pipe Tubohotel accommodates two people in a queen bed with panoramic views of the Sierra del Tepozteco outside of Cuernavaca. The goal in designing the modular hotel was to build fast and affordable accommodations while offering new tourism services to the area.

Each tube is 2.44 m wide and 3.50 m long and accommodates a queen bed with space underneath for storage. Custom built end caps provide windows and a door on one side with curtains for privacy. The tube rooms certainly aren’t large enough for a bathroom, so the hotel offers two bathhouses for their guests’ use.

t3arc was responsible for building the first modular set of three tube rooms, while the hotel completed the remaining rooms. The tubes were placed around a central outdoor courtyard situated amongst the trees with respect to the topography. Construction of the hotel took about 3 months.

:tubohotel

:t3arc

The Timmelsjoch Experience Pass Museum by Werner Tscholl

 

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photographs by Alexa Rainer

A road, formerly used mainly by migrating wild animals, connects the Pesseiertal and Ötztal valleys. These valleys, surrounded by a natural border created by the foot of the Timmelsjoch mountain chain, are connected by an ancient and rare simmilarity. Architectonic sculptures, situated on several touristic stops  along the road, introduce the beautiful landscape panoramas, its history, cultural background as well as local community and the economy of the region. Located along a mountain pass, the Timmelsjoch Experience Pass Museum was constructed to celebrate the road’s fiftieth anniversary.

Located on the border of Germany (North Tyrole) and Italy the Pass Museum points out towards the South Tyrole side with its boulder-like structure. Glass covers the internal walls of the building and is faceted to resemble the inside of an icy cave, which honors the pioneers of High Alpine Road and their advancements.

This is breath-taking. What a beautiful work of art for all passerby’s to experience. I can’t wait to take that road trip!

:dezeen

:architecturelover

Mobile Dwelling Unit

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This is called a Mobile Dwelling Unit 00001. What a unique way to recycle used shipping containers. This unit is a 40ft shipping container that has been modified into a relocatable dwelling. Each of the slide-out elements is equipped as the familiar spaces we are used to : the kitchen; a bathroom with a sink, shower and toilet, a sleeping compartment, a living room unit, a reading nook and a closet. A shipping container home designed to travel sleek and narrow – yet be capable of expanding outwards when stationary – to more normal livability standards. You are sure to be the talk of the town in this unique home.

:fabprefab

Travelodge Building Pop-Up Prefab Hotels

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Travelodge is looking seriously at prefab hotels and is building their first in the west London district of Uxbridge, right now. it is like a pop-up prefab:

“It could facilitate the creation of hotels on a temporary basis at times of peak demand in certain locations — such as festivals or sporting events,” the firm’s director of property and development Paul Harvey said. “A temporary structure to fill such a need would differ to the design of a permanent hotel but it could be built in as little as 12 weeks and removed quickly at the end of the event when the need is gone.”

According to Reuters, the modules were imported from China with bathrooms already installed, with windows fitted and furnishings and decorations added once the containers have been put together.

But for future hotels, the firm hopes even the furnishing and decoration could be done in China.

Travelodge says using the Chinese-built modules is 25 percent faster and 10 percent cheaper, making it a core part of their strategy to become the largest hotel operator in London by the 2012 Olympics.

The firms behind the modular design — Verbus Systems, a joint-venture between consulting engineers Buro Happold and constructor George & Harding — say the modular system could also be used for student accommodation and urban housing.

:treehugger

Phooey Fun House

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Now, even more recycled fun can be had in Melbourne-based Phooey Architects’ shipping container playground, which revamps four shipping containers and other reclaimed materials into an attractive yet functional activity centre, designed to provide kids living in South Melbourne’s public housing with safe spaces to create art, dance and play.

Called the Skinners Playground, it is a low-cost, zero-waste project, using an array of recycled materials that range from the windows to the fasteners. Nothing is lost nor tossed: the playground’s structural and decorative components (such as stair railings, balconies and overhangs) derive from carefully sliced pieces of the original containers. All the interior spaces have openings, either offering views to the outside or to a well-placed sandpit. There’s even a bed of weeds that catches rainwater. It seems like a project with its heart in the right place – a kid-centric space and structure that can allow the community’s children to take an active part in building upon their imaginations.

Habode

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Habode buildings challenge everything we know about functionality and building techniques. They embrace innovation in design and construction, by using a blueprint that consistently produces exacting, high quality buildings without sacrificing aesthetics and style.

Much like modern manufacturing techniques used in the automotive industry, the Habode Prefab is constructed in a customised factory.

The principal advantage of prefabricated housing is that it potentially offers more for less:

  • More quality for less time at site
  • More tangible out comes and less risk
  • More energy efficiency for less resource

Once completed in our factory and utilising the patented Habode “fold-out” system, your Habode can be shipped and transported worldwide as in their shipping mode they are compliant with international shipping standards with respect to dimension and structural characteristics.

Once landed and trucked to your site this unit is positioned onto its foundations. This operation can be performed in eight hours provided weather is favourable. (Full completion within two days.)

All this ensures dramatic reductions in home building costs and waiting times without diminishing the quality of construction.

Technical benefits of prefab buildings =

  • Quality Controls
  • Factory Manufacture
  • Testing
  • Joint Minimisation
  • Tighter Tolerances
  • Eliminate Defects

Social benefits of prefab buildings =

  • Indoor Protection
  • Material and Tool Security
  • Worker Health and Safety
  • Machinery and Training Investment
  • Tighter Tolerances
  • Employment Stability

Economic benefits of prefab buildings =

  • Time Savings (30-60%)
  • Cost Savings
  • Reduced Dependance on Weather
  • Coordinated Trades In-House
  • Bulk ordering
  • Reduced Transport to site

Sustainability benefits of prefab buildings =

  • Reduced Material Waste
  • Increased Energy Efficiency
  • Less Disruption at Site

Why is Habode so different?

The ridged steel sub-frame not only ensures unsurpassed strength and exact dimensions but a structure that can withstand almost everything that man and nature can throw at it.

Habode was designed in New Zealand to suit the unique Australasian conditions. From extreme heat, torrential downpours and extreme winds, Habode buildings meet or surpass all New Zealand building codes.

The other benefit of Habode is the ability to reach difficult or remote sites. Habode really can make your home anywhere.

:habode

R4House

The R4House prototype consists of two bioclimatic homes made from materials that close the loop. The energy consumption of both is zero due to its bioclimatic design, the solar panels and the geothermal energy source. The waste production during construction is also zero. Both homes are modular and built from six recycled shipping containers; low-cost and allowing flexibility. The 4 Rs stand for Reuse, Recover, Recycleand Reasoning with the latter being the most important says Garrido. “With the construction sector being very inert and sustainable architecture looking to establish itself, reasoning is required to redesign the construction process and lower its negative impact on the environment.” The construction materials as well as interior ones have been carefully chosen and are all recycled as well as recyclable.

The R4House is however not only ecological but also economical in terms of pricing. With the R4House, Garrido hopes to set an example for sustainable architecture in Spain and beyond.

:luisdegarrido

Future Shack

Seeing one of the roles of first-world, democratic countries as humanitarian, Sean Godsell designed emergency and relief housing that utilize recycled shipping containers. Mass-produced, inexpensive, and easy to ship and stockpile, the containers are approximately 8 feet wide by 8 feet high by 20 feet long, and adequate size for temporary housing. The Future Shack, through its use of a prefabricated, universal unit and a roof capable of site-specific material manipulation, embodies the contradictions of contemporary life.

At the entrance to the container (image previous page) a ramp lowers to allow access to the raised floor as the wall raises to provide shade and create a makeshift verandah. This subtle maneuver is one of the few changes to the module – which also includes adding small openings for the roof structure and ventilation – and, along with the roof canopy, helps to create a sense of home. It is with the roof and verandah, among other design features, that the Future Shack does not merely provide necessities in response to emergency; it also symbolizes the idea of home, an idea needed to reach beyond the repetitive and modular character of the shipping container.

Inside the shack is lined with plywood and features built-in furniture – a table and bed that fold down from the wall – and a separating wall that contains plumbing fixtures for the kitchen and the bathroom beyond. By allowing the furniture to be either “open” or “closed” the single room container can be relatively spacious but also intimate, depending on the articulation of elements at any give time.

Given the Future Shack’s simple, yet ambitious, goal – to provide temporary emergency and relief housing – the means and the end are both admirable, recognizing the contradictions inherent in contemporary life. Whereas the means utilizes technology and the exchange of goods among world countries, the end becomes ultimately site-specific as the occupant is able to manipulate the roof canopy and certain interior elements. The global vs. local and macro vs. micro readings allow the Future Shack to be both a reliable solution and something to be called home, albeit for a short period of time.

:archidose